To succeed, forget self-esteem
September 21, 2012 by
Categories: News, Reblogged

Heidi Grant Halvorson recently wrote on the Harvard Business Review Blog on switching our thinking away from improving our self-esteem to increasing our self-compassion. She writes:

“Self-compassion is a willingness to look at your own mistakes and shortcomings with kindness and understanding — it’s embracing the fact that to err is indeed human. When you are self-compassionate in the face of difficulty, you neither judge yourself harshly, nor feel the need to defensively focus on all your awesome qualities to protect your ego. It’s not surprising that self-compassion leads, as many studies show, to higher levels of personal well-being, optimism and happiness, and to less anxiety and depression.”

This is a well written post that is thought provoking and offers a lot of helpful information. Click the link below for the full post:

To succeed, forget self-esteem

You may be interested in...

Perspectives on shame, Part II
A Therapist in Public
The big picture
Recent posts What we blog about
acceptance adventure Change charter for compassion clients coming back compassion Connection coping couples don't give up emotions empathy family fear feelings grief growth happiness healing health human humility inner fight journey life loneliness metaphors mindfulness perspective quote relationship relationships relationship with client sadness self self-growth self-inquiry self acceptance shame sharing stress therapist therapy vulnerability

No Thoughts About To succeed, forget self-esteem

Share your thoughts

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*